Best Monofilament Fishing Line Reviews

Best Monofilament Fishing Line Reviews

When going fishing, it's important to use the best gear for you and the type of fishing you're doing. Line is just one part of the total gear collection, but it's perhaps the most important part.

The three basic types of line you can use are braided, fluorocarbon and monofilament fishing line. All three have their uses, but mono is definitely a good choice for certain kinds of fishing because of its stretch. Keep reading to find out our pick for the best monofilament fishing line.

Product

Price

Rating

Suffix Superior Monofilament Line

$$$

Stren MagnaThin Monofilament Line

$$$$

Ande Monofilament Line

$$

Berkley Trilene XT Monofilament

$$$$$

KastKing Durablend Monofilament Leader Line

$

Why Use Monofilament Fishing Line?

Monofilament is a good choice of line because it's inexpensive, versatile, flexible, less visible in clear water, safer, and it comes in a variety of colors. It also floats, hold knots well, casts well, and has significantly more stretch than other kinds of line. It's a multipurpose line that a lot of anglers use in at least some fishing situations. The best monofilament fishing line you want is for the following kinds of fishing:

  • fishing with top-water lures.
  • jig fishing for walleyes and crappies.
  • casting crankbaits for bass and walleyes.
  • big game trolling.
  • live bait fishing.
  • kite fishing.
  • fishing in extra clear water

Best Way to Use Mono Fishing Line

Mono can be weaker than other types of line, so it's a good idea to keep it fresh by changing it throughout the season. Just cut off a portion of the line after you've spent a few days fishing. This will ensure that the line will be fresh for next time and won't snap when you've got a big one on the line.

One of the advantages of mono is that it comes in a variety of colors. Because mono is so affordable, many anglers find it's worthwhile to have a few colors on hand. That way, you can change things up depending on the current situation. Using the right color line for the conditions can make a big difference. When the line isn't visible to the fish, they're more likely to bite. Clear mono line is a great option for really clear water, but in other situations a green or blue or yellow line might be a better choice

It's also important to know which situations really call for mono and which ones don't. Mono can really be a disadvantage in some kinds of fishing. If you're casting with spin tackle, mono probably won't help and may well hurt. Mono is versatile and works well in a lot of fishing situations, but be aware of the times when mono might hurt you.

What Differentiates Different Kinds of Mono Line?

Like with anything else, not all monofilament fishing line is exactly the same. Some lines just perform better than other lines. However, the biggest factor when choosing a mono line is exactly what kind of fishing you're planning to use it for and what your fishing style is. For example, many anglers who are especially concerned with accuracy and casting distance find that a softer line with a smaller diameter works best. For offshore trolling, though, the best line might be one that is stronger and more resistant to abrasion.

Things to consider when choosing your best monofilament fishing line:

  • strength - measured by the pound test, the strength you use should match the weight of what you're fishing for.
  • diameter - a smaller diameter line has better sensitivity, less visibility, and better lure and bait action.
  • strength to diameter ratio - the highest strength with the lowest diameter possible is generally what you want.
  • knot strength - how well a line performs with knots, how resistant the line is to knot breakage or slippage.
  • suppleness - the degree of how stiff or soft and silky the line is; more supple line passes easily through rod guides, casts well and sinks more naturally.
  • durability - how well the line holds up over time and resists weakening or breaking.
  • abrasion resistance - how well the line handles rubbing against rocks and other things; abrasion resistant lines are less likely to break.
  • stretch - the amount of give in the line; sometimes you want some delay, like with topwater lures, but other times too much stretch can be a disadvantage.
  • memory - lower memory is generally better, but all mono has some memory or the degree to which it takes on the shape of the reel.
  • color - different colors are better choices for different water conditions, with the goal being for the line to be less visible to fish.

The most important things from this list are strength (pound test), diameter, and stretch. The pound test is important because it tells you the kind of control you'll have with a bigger fish. Diameter is important because it has a big impact on how well the line casts, how quickly it sinks, and how deep it will run. Stretch is important because sometimes a line with some stretch is beneficial, and other times it can hurt you, so it's important to consider just how much stretch a line has. When you balance the strength, diameter, and stretch of a mono line, you get a pretty good idea of how that line will perform for the kind of fishing you want to use it for.

How to Choose a Monofilament Fishing Line

Ande Monofilament Line

When choosing a monofilament fishing line, many anglers first think about the kind of fishing they want to do with the line. It's a good idea to consider the most important qualities a line needs for different kinds of fishing. Is the strength of the line the most important factor? If so, you want to choose a line with higher strength. If you're fishing for walleye or fishing in an environment with a lot of rocks or weeds, you may want to choose a line that is more abrasion resistant. If you're going trolling for big game, the stretch factor should be high on your list when considering line type. You also should think about the water conditions where you'll be fishing, which will help you decide whether to get transparent or colored mono line.

It's not always necessary, but many anglers prefer premium mono line. It's a little bit pricier, but it's still very affordable, especially when compared to other kinds of line. A pro tip is to buy all your line towards the end of the season when it will be cheaper so that you'll be stocked up for next season. It's also usually going to be a better price when you buy in larger quantities, so when you know a line works well for you, you should think about buying it in bulk.

The best line for one angler might well be different than it would be for another angler. Try a line and see how it works for you and your style of fishing. Do a little trial and error, and you'll find the line you like best. Mono is great for this because it is more affordable. You can also experiment by trying the line of friends. When you find a line you like, buy your own.

Getting the Most Out of Your Line

When you've found a mono line that you like, you want to make sure that it's well-maintained so that it lasts and continues working well. Don't leave it out in the sun when you're not fishing, and try not to keep it stored in excessive heat. Sun and heat can weaken the line which leads to breaking. You should also just pay attention to your line. If you feel any bumps or nicks when you run your finger along the line, you should cut off a portion.

Another good idea is to just regularly discard a portion of the line, especially after a few days of heavy fishing or when you notice your line is looking lighter in color. The last thing you want is for your line to break when you've got a big fish on the line, so make sure you don't forget about the care and maintenance of your line. Check your line regularly and retie often, especially after catching a fish. Using a line conditioner can also be a good idea, as it helps prevent your line from breaking down.

Top 5 Monofilament Fishing Lines

Suffix Superior Monofilament Line

Suffix Superior Monofilament Line

Suffix Superior makes a quality mono line that is abrasion resistant and strong. The price is great because of the large spool size, so it's a great option for stocking up on mono line. Available in clear, yellow, and blue, this line works well in a variety of water conditions. It's also available in many different strengths, from 10 pound to 130 pound.

Things We Liked

  • Very strong.
  • Abrasion resistant.
  • Available in many different strengths and colors.
  • Controlled stretch.
  • Very high strength to diameter ratio.

Things We Didn't Liked

  • Low stretch

Stren MagnaThin Monofilament Line

Stren MagnaThin Monofilament Line

The extremely small diameter really makes Stren's line stand out. It sinks fast and has less water drag, but it remains strong. It has very low visibility, so it's great for clear water fishing. It's also excellent for casting accuracy.

Things We Liked

  • Extremely smalll diameter.
  • High strength to diameter ratio.
  • Excellent castability.
  • Relatively high stretch.

Things We Didn't Like

  • Potential for knot slippage.
  • Higher stretch than other lines.

Ande Monofilament Line

Ande Monofilament Line

Ande makes one of the most affordable lines that can hold its own in quality. It's a strong and abrasion resistant line that has a relatively small diameter, though not quite as small as Stren. It's flexible and gets the job done and is a good choice especially if you're on a budget.

Things We Liked

  • Very affordable price.
  • Abrasion resistant.
  • Relatively small diameter.
  • Good knot strength.
  • A variety of color options.

Things We Didn't Like

  •  A bit stiff.

Berkley Trilene XT Monofilament or Berkley Trilene Big Game Monofilament

Berkley Trilene XT Monofilament or Berkley Trilene Big Game Monofilament

The Berkley Trilene XT line is a go-to choice for anglers who often fish in rough physical conditions with lots of weeds and rocks. This line may be one of the most abrasion resistant lines out there. It's a good choice for trolling and it also casts well. The Berkley Big Game line is similally very abrasion resistant and strong, with a controlled stretch that makes it ideal for fishing big game.

Things We Liked

  • Extremely abrasion resistant - great for rocks, docks, and weeds.
  • Very durable.
  • Strong.

Things We Didn't Like

  • Thicker diameter.
  • Higher memory than other lines.
  • A bit stiff.

Winner for Best Monofilament Fishing Line: KastKing Durablend Monofilament Leader Line

KastKing Durablend Monofilament Leader Line

KastKing is a well respected and award winning brand, and with good reason. This line is strong and flexible with great castability and high knot strength. It's smaller than many lines, with a really high tensile strength to diameter ratio. The low stretch makes it particularly sensitive, allowing you to really feel what's going on. KastKing advertises this line as being a good substitute for fluorocarbon line, so it's also a good choice for anglers who usually don't fish with mono. KastKing's line works particularly well in saltwater, but it's a great line for freshwater fishing as well.

Things We Liked

  • Low stretch.
  • High tensile strength.
  • Abrasion resistant.
  • Flexible.
  • Very castable.
  • High knot strength.
  • Great packaging keeps you tangle free.
  • Small diameter.

KastKing has no real cons, so it's a clear top choice line. New and experienced anglers alike will be happy with this line. Some of the other lines might be a better choice for some anglers, like the Berkely Trilene XT for those who fish in a lot of tough physical spots, but KastKing really stands out in so many important categories that it's a hard line to beat.